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Tyco provide “Shell & Core Build” and “Fit-out” sprinkler packages to customers in over 17 different vertical markets to all international design standards including LPC, NFPA, BSEN FM and many others.

In addition, we have dedicated design engineers and project management teams working exclusively in “preferred supplier partnerships” within the education, retail warehousing, and traffic & transportation industries.

We are totally committed to the development of “best practice” design, project management and installation access equipment so that even the most complex “New Build” or “Refurbishment can be completed in record time with the minimum of disruption. Depending on the type of fire risk and working environment involved, we can provide up to five different types of sprinkler system.

Wet

Wet valve sprinkler systems are permanently charged with water and used to protect premises where temperatures are unlikely to fall below freezing point. They are designed to actuate operate electric, and/or hydraulic alarms when there is a steady flow of water into the system that is equivalent to the discharge rate of one or more sprinklers.

The type of sprinkler nozzle, its discharge pattern and flow rate are all pre-determined by the hazard classification of the type of fire risk involved. A typical Wet valve sprinkler system comprises of a control valve, sprinkler discharge heads and a dedicated water supply system.

The size of the valve, its flow rate and the system water supply pressure and air pressure are all determined by the size and type of fire risk involved.

Dry

Dry valve sprinkler systems are permanently charged with air and used to protect unheated premises such as warehouses, parking garages, attic spaces and other areas exposed to freezing temperatures.

When the system is set is charged with air, the minimum air pressure includes a safety factor to prevent potential “Towns Main” water pressure fluctuations from forcing the Dry valve clack open to allow water into the system pipework.

Alternate

As the name implies, the sprinkler system pipework is charged with water in the summer and with air in the winter when there is a danger of pipework freezing. When the system is charged with air, the operation of one or more sprinklers, activates the sprinkler control valve to rapidly allow the flow of water into the sprinkler distribution pipework were it is discharged through the open sprinklers onto the seat of the fire.

The type of sprinkler nozzle, its discharge pattern and flow rate are all pre-determined by the hazard classification of the type of fire risk involved. When the system is set is charged with air, the minimum air pressure includes a safety factor to prevent potential water pressure fluctuations from forcing Main water into the system pipework

A typical Alternate Valve sprinkler system comprises of a control valve, sprinkler discharge heads and a dedicated water supply system.

The size of the valve, its flow rate, the system water supply pressure and air pressure are all determined by the size and type of fire risk involved.

Pre-Action

These systems are specifically designed for the protection of high value “Business Critical” areas where sensitive electrical equipment or goods are stored to provide prior warning of system discharge or prevent system discharge caused by accidental damage to a sprinkler or system pipework.

A Pre-action sprinkler system comprises a standard Deluge valve sprinkler system and an independent system of heat or smoke detectors installed in the same areas as the sprinklers.

The Deluge valve is a diaphragm style valve that depends upon air in the diaphragm chamber to hold the diaphragm closed against the water supply. Any accidental damage to a sprinkler or a detector head in a “non-fire” situation will NOT bring the control valve into action but will cause both visual and audible alarms to be raised to alert the building’s fire safety officer to the situation.

In the event of a fire, when two or more detector heads operate, they send a signal to the main fire control panel. On receipt of this signal, the fire control panel operates the solenoid release valve, releasing the pressure off the diaphragm unit to open the Deluge valve and discharge water into the system in readiness for a sprinkler head to open when it reaches its designated operating temperature.

This process provides the building’s fire safety officer with prior warning of the impending event so that the Company’s established fire control plan can be immediately initiated to minimise the impact of the fire threat.

The size of the Deluge valve, its flow rate, the system water supply pressure and type of detection system are all determined by the size and type of fire risk involved.

Sprinkler Heads

The water discharged from the sprinkler is distributed by the deflector over the location of the fire. The area protected by each sprinkler is determined by the hazard and can vary from 9m2 to 21m2. The selection of the deflector is based upon the specific application, its upright or pendent position within the sprinkler distribution pipework and its spray pattern.

In the event of a fire, the sprinkler head is designed to give a density of not less than 5 litres per square metre per minute over the nominal area of coverage. The sprinkler bulb is designed to operate at a predetermined temperature depending on its location and working environment.

The water discharged from the sprinkler is distributed by the deflector over the location of the fire. The area protected by each sprinkler is determined by the hazard and can vary from 9m2 to 21m2. The selection of the deflector is based upon the specific application, its upright or pendent position within the sprinkler distribution pipework and its spray pattern.

Sprinklers are manufactured with three different connection sizes (10, 15 and 20mm) which have different water outputs (57, 80 and 115litres/minute respectively) at a flow pressure of 1 bar. The sprinkler bulb is designed to operate at a predetermined temperature. A range of operating temperature ratings is available from between 57 – 182 degrees Centigrade.

Conventional sprinklers

These can be mounted in either the upright or the pendent position and the deflector is designed to spray a proportion of the water discharge on to the surface of the ceilings.

Upright and pendent spray sprinklers

Spray sprinklers are used for applications where all the water needs to be discharged downwards.

Sidewall sprinklers

These are primarily used to keep ceilings clear of pipework for aesthetic reasons or to avoid having to disturb existing ceilings when installing pipework. Each sprinkler protects up to 17m2 in light hazards and 9m2 in ordinary hazards.

Horizontal sidewall sprinklers with extended coverage

These are specifically designed to give an extended coverage of water distribution. This type of sprinkler must have a fast response bulb. One sprinkler can protect an area of up to 21m2.

Fast response sprinklers for life safety

In a fire, few deaths result from direct contact with flames. The greatest threat comes from inhalation of the products of combustion such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen chloride and other toxic gases, and the heat of the gases.

The response time of a fast response sprinkler ensures that the life threatening level of toxic gases and temperature are never reached. There are people who cannot escape by their own efforts, such as in hospitals or homes for the aged, and sprinklers provide valuable time for those in charge to assist their escape.

Sprinkler Valves

Wet valve sprinkler systems are permanently charge with water and are designed to actuate operate electric, and/or hydraulic alarms when there is a steady flow of water into the system that is equivalent to the discharge rate of one or more sprinklers.

When the fire system is initially being pressurised, water will flow into the system until the water supply and system pressure become equalised, and the torsion spring closes the clapper in the Alarm Check Valve and forms a seal. This seal prevents any water flow through the alarm port to the alarm devices.

In the event of a fire, the steady flow of water equivalent to the discharge rate of one or more sprinklers will cause a pressure imbalance on the Alarm Check Valve seal. This causes the clapper to open, to allow a continued flow of water through the sprinkler system until the fire has been extinguished and the Wet system control valve has been closed and reset in readiness for further emergencies.

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Tyco SprinklerSense Brochure

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